Youth Sports: How Concerned Should I Be About Concussions?

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Youth Sports: How Concerned Should I Be About Concussions?
One of the biggest concerns that many parents of school-aged children are facing is the effects of sports on their kids’ health. Physical health is not the only thing that can be affected by youth sports; these activities also have an impact on children’s mental and emotional health. So in this entry titled “Youth Sports: How Concerned should I Be about Concussions?” we aim to shed light on your worries as a parent of a middle- or high-schooler.

In almost every sport, concussions occurring are almost always a possibility. However, experts in the field of medicine and sports have come to an agreement that out of all these physical activities, football is the one that puts kids who play it at the highest risk of getting concussions. And while the number of head-trauma related incidents arising from basketball, volleyball, soccer, baseball, and even cheerleading has also increased, sports and educational officials confirm that the statistics are greater when it comes to football. Some of the key reasons for this are the game’s popularity, the total number of participants and of course, and the collisions that occur during games.

With around 87 percent of parents confirming that they are indeed worried for their children who participate in sports, there is no longer a need to wonder why the number of students participating in such activities has seen a considerable decrease.

And as youth sports continue to increase in competitiveness, a lot of parents agree that their children are suffering. So with all these being pointed out, should you be concerned about your child suffering from concussions? The answer is of course, yes, as it is only logical for you to think about the safety, welfare, and health of your kid. How do you tell your kid this then? Communicating with your child and showing him/her your concern is a key step to helping him or her understand your concerns. While you should not just pull your kid out of a sports team, it is important that he/she also understands your concern.




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